Can Masks Capture Coronavirus Particles?

Can homemade DIY and surgical masks protect against the coronavirus

With the outbreak of the coronavirus, many people are wondering if masks capture coronavirus particles. It’s a lot to ask billions of people around the world to become mask experts overnight.

Quora: Can masks protect us from Wuhan coronavirus

There is a lot of conflicting information. Do surgical masks capture coronavirus particles? Media outlets like US National Public Radio have claimed they don’t. Fortunately, scientists have already accumulated hard data on air pollution masks that can answer these questions.

How Big Are Coronavirus Particles?

First things first: we need to know how big the coronavirus is. Scientists have already used electron microscopes to measure how big the corona virus is. Coronavirus particles (fancy scientific name “virions”) are spheres with diameters of approximately 0.125 microns (125 nm). The smallest particles are 0.06 microns, and the largest are 0.14 microns.

Coronavirus virus particle size

This means coronavirus particles are smaller than the PM2.5 cutoff, but bigger than some dust particles and gases.

Size of coronavirus particle pm2.5 and bacteria

Now that we know how big the particles are, do masks capture coronavirus particles? Let’s break this down into two simpler questions.

 

1. Can Masks Capture Coronavirus Particles?

The skeptic case: 

Amid the outbreak, some people have said: The coronavirus (and other viruses for that matter) is tiny, and masks are so thin. They can’t possibly get tiny coronavirus particles. Business Insider used this logic in their article whose title claimed masks “probably won’t protect you.”

 

Coronavirus & Mask Livestream

Wondering whether masks work to protect you against the coronavirus? Check out our livestream recap covering all the info here!

 

The scientific test:

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh tested different common masks by running a diesel generator (to mimic car exhaust) and piping the exhaust through the masks. They used a particle counter to see how many particles made it through the mask. Here’s my super scientific rendering of the setup:

 

 

One important detail: the particle counter they used measured particles as small as 0.007 microns. That’s over 10 times smaller than the coronavirus particle diameter. We’re talking about truly tiny particles here!

They tested a whole range of masks, and here’s what they found:

N95 mask surgical masks Respro particle capture test data

 

3M industrial filters were able to capture over 95% of particles down to 0.007 micron. Given that news outlets have claimed surgical masks can’t capture nanoparticles, it’s particularly surprising that the surgical mask was able to capture 80% of the tiny particles.

Masks Capture Car Exhaust

OK, but that was car exhaust. Maybe there’s something different about virus particles? In another study, researchers shot actual virus particles at N95 masks. The masks captured over 95% of virus particles.

N95 Masks Capture Virus Particles

Even poorly performing masks captured over 90% of viruses. The researchers chose two N95 masks that scored poorly in an earlier study, yet even these poor-performers still blocked 94% of particles under the heaviest air flow rate.

N95 Masks Capture Virus Particles

Conclusion: Masks – including surgical masks and N95 masks – can capture viruses and even particles over 10 times smaller.

 

2. “OK, they can capture particles even smaller than the coronavirus, but when you wear them, all the air just leaks in the side.” 

 

The skeptic case: 

Mask works in theory, but those tests aren’t on real faces! When you actually wear them, you can’t get a good enough fit, so they’re basically useless.

The scientific test:

To answer this question, you need a really expensive fit-test machine. Fortunately, we were able to get our hands on one machine to test a range of masks.

 

Pollution masks N95 fit test TSI 3M

 

The blue tube is sampling air outside the mask, while the white tube is sampling air from inside it (more details on the mask fit-test methods). 

Smart Air co-founder Anna Guo and Beijing-based Dr. Richard Saint Cyr also did fit tests, so I combined all of our data. Here’s how well the masks worked on our faces:

 

Pollution masks respirator fit test data haze

View the full test data »

Several 3M masks were able to capture over 99% of tiny 0.01 micron particles (10 times smaller than the coronavirus), even while on people’s face. What’s more, surgical masks were surprisingly effective, capturing 63% of the tiny virus-sized particles.

Read more: Scientists randomized nurses to wear masks and tracked who get infected. Here’s what they found. »

 

Bottom Line: Can Masks Protect People From The Coronavirus?

Masks can filter particles as small as 0.007 microns – 10 times smaller than viruses, and much, much smaller than the PM2.5 cutoff. What’s more, they work surprisingly well, even while people are wearing them. Surgical masks don’t work as well as N95 masks, but they are cheaper and more readily available. This makes them useful alternatives when other masks aren’t available.


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